Scalp Acupuncture

 Dr. Tony Willcox completing his 2nd Doctorate in Acupuncture studying at Anhui University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Pictured here learning Zhu's Scalp acupuncture with Dr. Pan in Hefei, China.

Dr. Tony Willcox completing his 2nd Doctorate in Acupuncture studying at Anhui University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Pictured here learning Zhu's Scalp acupuncture with Dr. Pan in Hefei, China.

Yamamoto's New Scalp Acupuncture (YNSA)

Originating from Japan, Toshikatsu Yamamoto’s scalp acupuncture is based around five points that are highly effective in the treatment of paralysis, pain, and stroke patients. With time, he added the thorax and pubic bone, sensory points, peripheral points, and more.  YNSA It is not as widely used as other scalp acupuncture styles.

Chinese Scalp Acupuncture

The Chinese method of scalp acupuncture can be used solely or in conjunction with auricular therapy of the ear for managing motor and sensory problems along with regular body acupuncture points. It has great implications for neurological problems and in reducing headaches, musculo-skeletal pain, traumatic brain injuries, and vertigo. This would be the most common form of scalp acupuncture that is taught across acupuncture schools in the United States of America.

 Dr. Tony Willcox having personal tuition with Dr. Shi Xue min of Tianjin, China. Dr. Shi is famous for the documentary 9000 Needles and the developer of a technique called Xing Nad Kai Qiao or XNKQ. This technique is about utilizing scalp and body acupuncture to recover patients post stroke, hemiplagia and other neurological disorders such as dementia and parkinson's disease. 

Dr. Tony Willcox having personal tuition with Dr. Shi Xue min of Tianjin, China. Dr. Shi is famous for the documentary 9000 Needles and the developer of a technique called Xing Nad Kai Qiao or XNKQ. This technique is about utilizing scalp and body acupuncture to recover patients post stroke, hemiplagia and other neurological disorders such as dementia and parkinson's disease. 


Conclusion

While these three styles of acupuncture differ in their approach, the location of treatment, as well as what they target, their efficiency and brilliance is slowly gaining traction alongside auricular therapy, reflexology, and other types of Traditional Chinese Medicine. For more information on Scalp Acupuncture, contact Dr. Tony Willcox today, who can tailor a treatment for you utilizing Scalp Acupuncture.

Side effects may include: Relaxation, Stress Reduction and Feeling Better!

 

 

Powerful Scalp Acupuncture, The Many Styles

Scalp acupuncture is one of the lesser known treatment modalities of the acupuncture paradigm. This form of therapy is extremely effective and works through stimulation of the acupuncture needle on the scalp.

This technique has the ability to activate and stimulate certain areas of the body. For instance, if a patient has knee pain there is a corresponding point on the scalp that can benefit that region of the body. The whole body has reflex areas that are located on the scalp. This treatment of scalp acupuncture can have powerful medical implications for maladies such as paralysis and other associated neurological disorders.

This technique is based off of the principle that each area of the scalp is a miniature map of the body and its organs, similar to that of reflexology which is a form of therapy that many people know of today. 

The Technique

Delicate and slender are the needles which are inserted about a half centimeter to an inch beneath the skin’s surface. This treatment can produce effective results for many varied conditions. Needles are specifically inserted with an angular technique in order to focus on motor, sensory, vision, speech, or balance areas across the body. Different styles have evolved from China, Japan, Korea and Europe all of which have a systemized and specific procedure in order to be effective. 

Zhu’s Scalp Acupuncture

Zhu’s technique differs from other scalp acupuncture through its convenience and ease of use; patients can be seated in any position and continue about their activities without interruption. The added bonus is that it tends to be less painful than the other styles. The locations differ however, as Dr. Zhu's technique and protocol has his own diverse zones of treatment and a thinner acupuncture needle is utilized. Learning from the best, Dr. Tony Willcox is pictured below with Dr. Pan in Hefei at the Anhui University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China perfecting the scalp technique.